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Fanzines

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ArtFanzines

Weirdos, Freakaziods, Punks, Skaters, Leftists, Metal Heads, and Slackers…what bonds us all is art! We all know how the underground music scene has helped nuture underground illustrators, be it with flyers, album covers or other subversive materials. An early medium for freaks to express themselves with was the comic book.

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ArtFanzinesLiterature

I can’t remember a time in my life when I didn’t have an appreciation for art of all kinds, but it was being into the punk scene that made realize that there were so many ways to express oneself on an artistic vibe. I saw this taking place all around

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ArtBlack MetalFanzinesIllustrationMusic

CVLT Nation had the pleasure to talk to the infamous black metal artist, Daniel Desecrator, and today we are sharing that interview with you. We have also been lucky enough to work with him on designs for our clothing line, and he has created some seriously amazing pieces for CVLT

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ArtFanzinesPhotography

The F666 zine made its debut on September 25th, 2011 at the ‘Dreams Were Made For Mortals 2′ group art show at Brooklyn’s Saint Vitus Bar. The Fall 2011 zine is 36 pages (6×6=three 6) chronicling NYC photographer Suren Karapetyan’s coverage of the explosive New York metal scene. CVLT Nation

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ArtFanzines

The Unholy Bow is the final installment of Terence Hannum‘s 2011 zine collection. As with his previous editions, The Unholy Bow will be pure art both in presentation as well as content. It will be printed by 5nakefork, and it is a collection of digital collages by Hannum. He takes

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Black MetalFanzinesLiteratureMusicReviews

This tome has been the ridicule of some and received dark praise from others. My own notion of the book lies somewhere in between. Hideous Gnosis, subtitled ‘Black Metal Theory’ has a scholarly type approach to the writing style, and does become quite verbose at times but provokes many interesting

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80s HardcoreArtDIYFanzinesIllustrationThrash

One of the raddest things about being a punk kid in the 80’s was the fanzine culture. D.I.Y was not a word for us but an lifestyle. Out of this culture grew the cottage industry of fanzines & from this, the independent publishing houses that produced them. Back then these

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ArtFanzinesUncategorized

Terence Hannum of Locrian makes zines an art form. His carefully crafted and immaculately packaged zines are far, far from their photocopied and fucked up predecessors. This month, he released PURIFICATION, a collection of drawings and graphics, presented together using the concept of light, or at least, a departure from

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ArtFanzinesIllustrationMixed MediaPaintingPhotographySculpture

Karlynn Holland has made good on her promise to make Dreams Were Made For Mortals into an ongoing series of group shows, and Dreams Were Made For Mortals II is happening this Sunday, September 25th, at St. Vitus Bar in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. Holland is curating this one-day-only group show, inspired

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ArtBlack MetalFanzines

One of the sickest things about being a child of the 80’s hardcore scene was witnessing the explosion of fanzines that was taking place all around the world. This was during a time when there was no Internet or cell phones, so these fanzines acted as life lines that contacted

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ArtEventsFanzinesFeaturesIllustrationMixed MediaPaintingPhotography

If you are in the NYC vicinity this weekend, and need a cold beer and rad art to recover from a nasty hot day, here is an event you can’t miss…and if you are in Manhattan, that means getting your ass to Brooklyn, no matter how intimidating that seems (no

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ArtAvant GardeBlack MetalDoomFanzinesIllustrationLiteratureMusicPaintingPhotographyPost-PunkReviewsSludge

Esoterra was a zine which existed from the early 90’s up until the year 2000 chronicling the far-out of the far-out in culture. Emphasizing the importance of hidden and obscure voices, Esoterra easily found its self lodged on many bookshelves snugly between Simon Dwyer’s ‘Rapid Eye’ series, V. Vale’s ‘Re/Search’

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