Glass Stream of Live Sessions Review + Full Stream

Due to it’s incestuous relationship with with the sub-culture that has now become known as “hipster,” Indie Rock has become a bad word. It brings to mind college kids who pretentiously try to make music with no pretense, but most probably listened to pop punk in high school, as they grew up in the Burbs, and now that they are sowing their oats in bigger urban areas they are trying a little of everything – since unlike punks and metal heads, they don’t have anything they identify with so strongly that it sticks and stays.

What does this have to do with Glass? Well, they are indie rock not tainted by the aforementioned garbage that gets attached to indie rock. This is not something you would expect to come out of Greenville, SC. The post-punk elements rub elbows with breezy Sonic Youth-like drones. The vocals sometimes have a Lou Reed quality to their plaintive recital of the lyrics. The guitar is often noisy and jagged, but even more often holds a melodic jangle. The bass sound is crisp, but not heavy on the opener, and the guitar tone reminds me of late 90s PJ Harvey. The end is abrupt, sending them stumbling on into “S-Man,” and while the band indulges in their gloomier side,  they never touch on the big G-word. Their ambiance comes from a rawer, expand-and-contract dynamic. The vocals sometimes sound like Thurston Moore singing Kim Gordon’s parts. On “Room One,”the vocals can sometimes be a point of contention, but the guitar tone makes up for it.

 

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There is darker tinge to the latent heaviness in the angular groove of ” I’m Made of Plastic” – it’s vague in its allusions to stoner rock. This is one of the album’s most original songs, because you can’t pin it to one sub-genre, much less a band they are drawing inspiration from. Not that their influences aren’t more apparent in certain portions of the album. They find more crunch in the closing song (and Spark) finding a perfect balance of clean, effected guitar tones with a organic heavy feeling, so it never feels like you listening to mall metal, though at times comparisons to bands like Hum and Helmet could apply. I can appreciate how steeped in various angles of the 90s these cats are.
This is a live recording, which is even more impressive. Either they were running into a board of Clemson radio station, or someone really knew how to mic a room. This session is a easy listen that combines genres seamlessly. They have only been together for a year, so I look forward to what the future holds for these guys and hearing what kind of range they might encompass on a full length. Doom is one of my favorite sub-genres of metal, but I feel the band’s potential really lies into this unique blend of morose indie rock.

 

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The Author

Wil Cifer

Wil Cifer

Wil spouts his thoughts and theories on metal / goth/ post-punk/ and darker indie rock on blogs like Abysmal Hymns,No Clean Singing, Geekinthings, Treblezine etc...
Father of 6 year old a six year daughter London, He is very passionate about horror movies, comic books, the occult and Morrissey , though David Bowie will live on in his heart forever

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