Tom Coles
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Tom Coles

Tom Coles lives in Southern England and plays drums for Sail. He likes cats, gin and black metal. He suffers, but why?

MusicPost RockReviews

The final Isis record is lush and sad, a far cry from their jagged, formless early work. Immediately it’s obvious that there’s a change in the water; their structures are notably clearer, the synergy between musicians is stronger and the tracks are clearer, warmer and more melodic. It’s understandable that

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Black DeathFilmFull SetsMusic

Dani Filth has had a long and storied career, but despite all the controversies Cradle of Filth are in the strongest position they’ve been in years, undergoing a lineup shift that’s re-invigorated their live performance. Just before setting out on an expansive world tour, he took a moment to sit

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Uncategorized

Coming towards the end of a very long and storied career, Earth’s Angels of Darkness, Demons of Light 1 was a move away from the rich, syrupy layers of Bees Made Honey. Eight years old this month, Angels 1 shifted their sound into something a little less layered and more

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Uncategorized

The final two Isis records are often overlooked, but perhaps a little unfairly; though they lack the heft of their predecessors, on In the Absence of Truth Isis feel more comfortable in their skin, flirting with additional textures and balancing the instrumentation a little more. This re-adjustment shifts their attention

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Avant GardeDoomMusicSludge

  When I was planning this series, I knew this would be the Big One. Isis’s Panopticon is the jewel in their belligerent crown, a measured, cohesive, erudite record that caps off their early development. For those of you following this series who were looking forward to more – and

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Avant GardeDoomMusic

  With Celestial reforming, albeit briefly, it feels like an appropriate time to revisit all the major Isis releases. With the release of SGNL>05, Isis comprehensively completed their scratchy, abrasive phase and emerged with their rough edge sheared off. Oceanic ended up as a calmer, more thoughtful record with a

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