Posts Tagged

skinheads

80s HardcoreCvltureDIYFeaturedHardcoreHistoryMusicSocial Justice

by DARIEN CAVANAUGH via Defiant When alt-right poster boy Richard Spencer’s face ended up on the receiving end of the punch memed around the world on Inauguration Day, it raised questions among liberals and leftists about the role of violence in politics. The debate quickly intensified following reports that an

Read More
CvltureHistorySocial Justice

At CVLT Nation, we hold very passionate anti-racist beliefs, and we are not afraid to share these beliefs with our community. What has been happening in the United States over the past several years – the continuation, and maybe even escalation, of a 300-year campaign of violence and suppression against

Read More
DocumentariesFeaturedFilm

Text pinched via Suba Culture In 1969 the BBC documentary series ‘Man Alive’ produced the programme ‘What’s the The Truth About Hells Angels & Skinheads’, an attempt to reveal genuine insight into these two youth cults. Both groups were instantly recognisable to the British public but for sure the man

Read More
ArtCvltureFeaturedHistoryPhotography

Via Mashable The skinhead subculture first emerged in London in the mid-1960s, when a split developed among “mod” music fans. While more affluent mods could afford the fashionable clothes, scooters and amphetamines that typified the subculture, working-class mods had to make due with with more functional attire. These “hard mods”

Read More
ArtFanzinesFeaturedLiteratureMixed MediaPhotography

For better or for worse, the image of the skinhead defines a big part of what many in mass culture see as 1980s UK punk. But like so many subcultures (if not all of them), it is so much more complex than its stereotype, full of subcultures of its own.

Read More
ArtFeaturedPhotography

Anita Corbin has based her photography career on women. In 1980, she began a portrait series called Visible Girls, where she photographed double portraits of young women involved in various UK subcultures – rockabillies, mods, rude girls, skinheads, punks, rastas and women’s lib activists. The portraits capture a very special

Read More